Tag Archives: Walter Burley

Bulthuis on Burley on propositions

Over at the blog of the APA today, there’s an excellent interview with Nathaniel Bulthuis, whose research on Walter Burley’s views on the nature of propositions is germane to the interests of medieval logic. Among the many quite interesting things … Continue reading

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Ex impossibili sequitur quidlibet in the 13th C (part 2)

Oh, look, it’s Thursday again! Time to write another medieval logic post. We’re still doing Aristotle in my intro class, so I haven’t any new interesting medieval tidbits from class prep to share. So I guess I’ll just return to … Continue reading

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Integrating medieval logicians into Introduction to Logic

Term starts next week, and I am so pleased to be teaching again what is probably my favorite course ever, Introduction to Logic. Most of it is going to be a pretty standard Intro Logic course: syntax and semantics of … Continue reading

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What’s in a name?

Yesterday I was writing up comments on an essay on Heloise and Abelard, and found myself, somewhat to my surprise, stubbornly referring to her exclusively as “d’Argenteuil”. After all, we call him “Abelard”, not “Peter”, so why shouldn’t we afford … Continue reading

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Spotlight on William of Sherwood

When one thinks of the big names of medieval logic, it’s probably ones like William of Ockham, Jean Buridan, and Walter Burley that come to mind — or, if you’re a 13th C person, maybe Peter of Spain. So people … Continue reading

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