Author Archives: Sara L. Uckelman

Book Review: The Aristotelian Tradition: Aristotle‚Äôs Works on Logic and Metaphysics and Their Reception in the Middle Ages edited by Börje Bydén and Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist

Last month, I published a review of this book in Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval. The review is freely available to read online here. With a few reservations (specifically regarding its coverage of the Arabic developments), I highly recommend the … Continue reading

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Infinitary Logic in the Middle Ages?

Earlier this week I attended Computability in Europe, where I enjoyed catching up with many logic and computability friends, and answering random “did they do X in the Middle Ages?” questions. One in particular warranted a blog post; Benjamin Rin … Continue reading

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Notre-Dame de Paris and Medieval Philosophy

Monday night people across the world watched in horror as one of the most iconic buildings in France burned. The scenes of the raging inferno and the toppling steeple were horrifying, and the tragedy was compounded by uncertainty — would … Continue reading

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Who is Luisius Turrianus?

All right, this isn’t quite medieval, nor quite logical, but in the context of researching “Pepper is sold here and in Rome”, I came across a post-medieval text that mentions this example, in the context of a theological discussion. And … Continue reading

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On the selling of pepper: Sherwood, Auxerre, Bacon, and Spain

After our brief political digression last week, this week we’re back to the pepper puzzle. Since writing that post, I’ve been continuing to collect data on how medieval authors analysed these two sentences: (1) Pepper is sold here and in … Continue reading

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A medieval Brexit sophism

(With apologies to Burley, Buridan, Ockham, and PoV.) Curtain opens. Scene: the EU/UK Brexit negotiating room. PLATO, playing the part of the EU negotiators, is sitting at the table. Enter SOCRATES, playing the part of the UK parliament. SOCRATES: “In … Continue reading

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A medieval puzzle of generic subjects and conjunctive predicates

Last weekend I had the pleasure of giving a keynote talk at the Twelfth Annual Cambridge Graduate Conference on the Philosophy of Mathematics and Logic. I was asked to give an overview/introduction to medieval logic (here are my slides), working … Continue reading

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