Author Archives: Sara L. Uckelman

Four grades of necessity in Buridan

I’m currently reading through Paloma Pérez-Ilzarbe and María Cerezo’s History of Logic and Semantics: Studies on the Aristotelian and Terminist Traditions, a collection of papers in honor of Angel d’Ors, and learning all sorts of interesting things. In Calvin Normore’s … Continue reading

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Spotlight on Thomas Bricot

I’m moving office right now, which involves packing up all of my books (my dept. admin expressed doubt when I said seven crates wouldn’t be enough; I’ve now filled up that many twice, and still have about 1-2 more crates’ … Continue reading

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Iterated epistemic modalities

There is a lot of very interesting medieval work on epistemic modalities, usually found in treatises De scire et dubitare, and whenever I present on this material at conferences, contemporary logicians always want to know whether they considered iterated modalities. … Continue reading

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Nugatoriness (Part 2)

This post follows up on one from a few weeks ago, where I started investigating the word nugatoria in the context of medieval logic. What I discovered (thanks google!) when writing that post is that the Ars Emmerana has an … Continue reading

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The Logicians Who Say ‘Ne’

I’m currently in Stockholm for the 3rd Nordic Logic Summer School where I’ve been giving a introduction to logic in the Middle Ages. I brought along the Big Four (the textbooks of Bacon, Sherwood, Lambert, and Peter), as well as … Continue reading

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Nugatoriness (part 1)

Last week I was in Bonn for the Time and Modality workshop in Bonn, where I gave a talk based on my paper, “The Logic of Where and While in the 13th and 14th Centuries”. One of the definitions I … Continue reading

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Bulthuis on Burley on propositions

Over at the blog of the APA today, there’s an excellent interview with Nathaniel Bulthuis, whose research on Walter Burley’s views on the nature of propositions is germane to the interests of medieval logic. Among the many quite interesting things … Continue reading

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