Tag Archives: Sara L. Uckelman

Blinkered approaches and narrow-minded European-centrism: an apology

Last week I posted a quick and dirty recommended reading list for “getting started in medieval logic”, as the title of the post said. This post was shared in the Medieval Logic FB group, where it immediately sparked a discussion … Continue reading

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What Should I Read? Recommendations for getting started in medieval logic

Two weeks ago I was at a workshop and someone asked me what books they should read if they wanted to get started in medieval logic — not secondary sources, but which primary texts. I told him I’d write up … Continue reading

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Book Review: The Aristotelian Tradition: Aristotle‚Äôs Works on Logic and Metaphysics and Their Reception in the Middle Ages edited by Börje Bydén and Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist

Last month, I published a review of this book in Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval. The review is freely available to read online here. With a few reservations (specifically regarding its coverage of the Arabic developments), I highly recommend the … Continue reading

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Infinitary Logic in the Middle Ages?

Earlier this week I attended Computability in Europe, where I enjoyed catching up with many logic and computability friends, and answering random “did they do X in the Middle Ages?” questions. One in particular warranted a blog post; Benjamin Rin … Continue reading

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Notre-Dame de Paris and Medieval Philosophy

Monday night people across the world watched in horror as one of the most iconic buildings in France burned. The scenes of the raging inferno and the toppling steeple were horrifying, and the tragedy was compounded by uncertainty — would … Continue reading

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Who is Luisius Turrianus?

All right, this isn’t quite medieval, nor quite logical, but in the context of researching “Pepper is sold here and in Rome”, I came across a post-medieval text that mentions this example, in the context of a theological discussion. And … Continue reading

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On the selling of pepper: Sherwood, Auxerre, Bacon, and Spain

After our brief political digression last week, this week we’re back to the pepper puzzle. Since writing that post, I’ve been continuing to collect data on how medieval authors analysed these two sentences: (1) Pepper is sold here and in … Continue reading

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