Monthly Archives: June 2016

Why should we care about history of logic?

That was the talk of the keynote I gave at the Australasian Association for Logic conference in Melbourne a few hours ago. Of course, I naturally care quite a bit about history of logic, but tonight I wanted to spend … Continue reading

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Pre-1600 logic on googlebooks

I’ve been spending most of my time thinking about modern stuff rather than medieval stuff in the last few weeks, but there’s nothing like a commitment to have a post on this blog every Thursday to make sure I think … Continue reading

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Things that Everybody Knows which are not actually true

Up until a few days ago, if you’d asked me who was responsible for the view that “Man is rational animal”, or, more precisely, that rationality (or perhaps risiblity, or perhaps both) was the difference via which the species humans … Continue reading

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Longeway’s website

Just a quick post today, as I’ve spent most of the day at a fantastic Women in the History of Philosophy conference at Cambridge. But I was recently made aware of John Longeway’s (UW-Parkside) website — https://longeway.wordpress.com/ — which has … Continue reading

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A (brief) book review

The topic of today’s post isn’t quite medieval, but it’s within my own personal arbitrary cut-off date (1600), so that’s good enough for me. A few months ago I discovered the storage part of the main university library where the … Continue reading

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