Tag Archives: Aristotle

Book Review: The Aristotelian Tradition: Aristotle‚Äôs Works on Logic and Metaphysics and Their Reception in the Middle Ages edited by Börje Bydén and Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist

Last month, I published a review of this book in Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval. The review is freely available to read online here. With a few reservations (specifically regarding its coverage of the Arabic developments), I highly recommend the … Continue reading

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Commentary/book review: Virginie Greene, Logical Fictions in Medieval Literature and Philosophy (part 2)

(Read part 1 of the review.) Part I: Logical Fables Chapter 1: Abelard’s donkey: the non-existent particular Greene: “What is the contrary of a lion? Some may say a mouse; some may say a snail. What is the contradictory of … Continue reading

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What does demonology have to do with logic?

I recently found out (through falling into a research rabbit hole courtesy of wikipedia, that James I/VI wrote a book on demonology. Never one to let a sound and orderly research programme get in the way of interesting side-projects, I … Continue reading

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What problem was Ladd trying to solve?

Last weekend I was at an amazing conference on Feminist Philosophy and Formal Logic (which I’ve written about elsewhere), during which there were a number of papers on the history of women and logic. Frederique Janssen-Lauret gave a paper on … Continue reading

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Not quite medieval, not quite logic: Proclus’s commentary on Euclid

Earlier this week I was following up on some notes I’d scribbled down over a month ago in a meeting with a colleague, one of which was “Proclus: Image in the water”. A bit of googling later, and I found … Continue reading

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Integrating medieval logicians into Introduction to Logic

Term starts next week, and I am so pleased to be teaching again what is probably my favorite course ever, Introduction to Logic. Most of it is going to be a pretty standard Intro Logic course: syntax and semantics of … Continue reading

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Non-reflexive consequence relations

Among the many notes that I scribbled on handouts at the AAL a few weeks ago, one of them (on the handout for Colin Caret’s talk “Prospects for Non-Reflexivity” reads “Medieval non-reflexivity? Examples where “. I had a vague feeling … Continue reading

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Why should we care about history of logic? (expanded)

The goal of this post is to expand on the slides, linked in the previous post, for the talk I gave at the Australasian Association of Logic two weeks ago, on “Why should we care about history of logic?” This … Continue reading

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Pre-1600 logic on googlebooks

I’ve been spending most of my time thinking about modern stuff rather than medieval stuff in the last few weeks, but there’s nothing like a commitment to have a post on this blog every Thursday to make sure I think … Continue reading

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Things that Everybody Knows which are not actually true

Up until a few days ago, if you’d asked me who was responsible for the view that “Man is rational animal”, or, more precisely, that rationality (or perhaps risiblity, or perhaps both) was the difference via which the species humans … Continue reading

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