Tag Archives: John Buridan

Four grades of necessity in Buridan

I’m currently reading through Paloma Pérez-Ilzarbe and María Cerezo’s History of Logic and Semantics: Studies on the Aristotelian and Terminist Traditions, a collection of papers in honor of Angel d’Ors, and learning all sorts of interesting things. In Calvin Normore’s … Continue reading

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Integrating medieval logicians into Introduction to Logic

Term starts next week, and I am so pleased to be teaching again what is probably my favorite course ever, Introduction to Logic. Most of it is going to be a pretty standard Intro Logic course: syntax and semantics of … Continue reading

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Why should we care about history of logic? (expanded)

The goal of this post is to expand on the slides, linked in the previous post, for the talk I gave at the Australasian Association of Logic two weeks ago, on “Why should we care about history of logic?” This … Continue reading

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What’s in a name?

Yesterday I was writing up comments on an essay on Heloise and Abelard, and found myself, somewhat to my surprise, stubbornly referring to her exclusively as “d’Argenteuil”. After all, we call him “Abelard”, not “Peter”, so why shouldn’t we afford … Continue reading

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Spotlight on William of Sherwood

When one thinks of the big names of medieval logic, it’s probably ones like William of Ockham, Jean Buridan, and Walter Burley that come to mind — or, if you’re a 13th C person, maybe Peter of Spain. So people … Continue reading

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